Can the painting crack the mystery of ‘Wembley Point Woman’, who died a skyscaper in 2004?

Investigators are asking for information to help identify a woman who died in London 17 years ago.

The 5ft 2in black woman, aged 20 to 40, jumped or fell from the top floor of Wembley Point, a 21-storey skyscraper in west London, October 29, 2004.

But despite multiple information campaigns, the woman has never been identified.

Now the Missing Podcastwhich revisits unsolved missing persons cases, hopes that telling the story of the ‘woman from Wembley Point’ might finally provide some answers.

Investigators say the key may be an oil painting the woman was holding when she jumped.

The 5ft 2in black woman, pictured, aged 20 to 40, jumped or fell from the top floor of Wembley Point, a 21-storey skyscraper in west London, October 29, 2004

Presenter Pandora Sykes describes the 2ft x 1ft painting saying, “In the center of the frame is a figure with blank white space where the face should be. The figure appears to be holding a blue, yellow, and orange tribal mask.

‘In the space above his left shoulder are other blank-faced figures; some lying down, others touching their faces.

“Then, over the figure’s right shoulder is a woman, staring into space where the woman’s face should be, while a one-eyed, slightly menacing face hovers above her. “

Investigators from missing persons charity Locate International are circulating an image of the distinctive artwork in the hope that it will lead to the identity of the woman.

Investigators say the key may be an oil painting the woman was holding when she jumped.  Pictured is the oil painting she was holding when she fell to her death

Investigators say the key may be an oil painting the woman was holding when she jumped. Pictured is the oil painting she was holding when she fell to her death

Investigator Grace said: “Our calls regarding this artwork did not lead anyone to recognize the artwork, to recognize the style of the artwork, to recognize what the meaning might be or inspiration.” We hope to get this image out in front of as many people as possible in the North London area.

Can you help? Key questions about the Wembley Point woman

Locate International wants to speak to anyone with information about the situation and has shared the following prompts:

  • Did you live in the area between Seven Sisters Station in Tottenham and Wembley Point in Brent in October 2004 or before?
  • Do you recognize the woman? Perhaps you saw her taking the bus on this route at that time?
  • Do you recognize the painting found on his person?

For more information visit The Missing Podcast.

The woman’s body was found in the shallows of the River Brent at the foot of the tower.

Witnesses said she appeared to jump or fall from the 21st floor, top of the building. At the time, it served as a rooftop restaurant. The rest of the tower was used by businesses.

She wore a burgundy zipped jacket, a black leather glove on her right hand, a small black sweater with a polo neck and a burgundy sweater with a round neck.

She also wore tights, pants, black Sketchers boots, a silver watch, and had two rings: a silver ring on her little finger and a metal ring on her ring finger.

The woman also carried a copy of The Guardian newspaper, a black carry bag emblazoned with CPNY, a disposable lighter, cigarettes and a weekly pass issued at Seven Sisters Road station in Tottenham on October 26.

There was no purse or ID.

Former TFL investigator and employee Gary, who now volunteers with Locate International, said the bus pass, when taken alongside the newspaper, suggested the woman might have been a commuter.

“In my experience, customers have distinct habits of where they buy tickets, where they go and how they travel.

“A particular bus pass is unusual, especially a vintage bus pass, because usually bus rides are what we call hop on and hop off. People make very short trips.

Witnesses said she appeared to jump or fall from the 21st floor, top of the building.  At the time, it served as a rooftop restaurant.  The rest of the tower was used by businesses.  Pictured is Wembley Point

Witnesses said she appeared to jump or fall from the 21st floor, top of the building. At the time, it served as a rooftop restaurant. The rest of the tower was used by businesses. Pictured is Wembley Point

“Where the bus pass was purchased was very important because at this time of the morning it was clear that the person had a very close connection to that place. They probably lived very close, probably less than two miles or so.

He added: “I think it is reasonable, on a balance of probabilities, to establish that she had a connection to Wembley Point, whether it was a place of work or a place which she habitually and regularly frequented. .”

“Those two areas are definitely key areas where we need to focus our attention to potentially identify this woman.”

For confidential assistance, call the Samaritans on 116 123 or visit www.samaritans.org

About Catharine C. Bean

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